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Stylish Short Haircuts with Earrings

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The short hairs leave a lot of earlobes exposed for earrings. From Audrey Hepburn, Twiggy to Anne Hathaway or Emma Watson, fashion muses styled updos in short hairs in a very distinctive expression, emphasizing their face lines and personality. 

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Lengths and Balance

The pixie cut allows very bold designs such as drop earrings and hoops, especially for updos with bangs.  The focus will be shifted to the earlobes with the long blings. 

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When it comes to a messy bob or wavy short hair, the blings shimmering from the ears which are hidden behind the hair add glitter to the look.  It is very important to maintain a balance, and remember that less is really more.  A pair of very simple and subtle studs with diamonds, cubic zirconia or crystals will be amazing.  Never wear a large hoop for bob haircuts unless you want to get the hoops tangled in the hair, which ruins the balance.  

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Occasions 

Studs are a subtle style statement for daily wear and it can be easily co-ordinated with other jewelry and outfit.

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At formal and red-carpet events, texturized crops and straight blow-dried short hair are hot styles among the stars.  A pair of pear drop earrings with colored gemstones, opaque or not, will not disappoint.

 Asymmetrical or side-swept bob works perfectly with medium-length drops with chains, which become the highlight of the look.  

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Personality and Style

It is very important to find a style that suits one’s age and personality.  Young girls will go for piercings in stars, floral and any kind of new design. 

For mature ladies, a pair of classic pearl studs or a futuristic style with precious gemstones or diamonds will be a better way to look elegant. 

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Acknowledgement : http://www.jewellerynetasia.com/

 

 

THE DUCHESS’S ENGAGEMENT RING

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How much is the Duchess’s Engagement Ring worth today?

The Duchess of Cambridge’s engagement ring has been revalued at £300,000 ($506,550)—that’s more than 10 times the amount it was worth in 1981.

The inherited ring, which features a 12-carat sapphire surrounded by 14 diamonds, was valued at £28,000 ($47,278) when it was given to Princess Diana by Prince Charles.

The revaluation was part of a study conducted by jewellery expert Vashi Dominguez, who compiled a list of the world’s top 20 most famous engagement rings, noting how much each had risen in value since purchase.

While Kate’s ring unsurprisingly topped the list, it was followed by that of the Queen (a three-carat diamond solitaire surrounded by five smaller diamonds), worth £100,000 ($168,850). Also to make the list were Michelle Obama’s (valued at £26,000, or $43,901), and the Duchess of Cornwall’s (worth £250,000, or $422,125).

Acknowledgement : http://www.harpersbazaar.com

 

 

 

 

The JCK 2014 Jewelers’ Choice Awards

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The following designs are some of the winners of the 2014 Jewelers’ Choice Awards which appeared in March 2014 issue of JCK magazine.

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These designs are exciting, trendy and beautiful. They are plucked from various jewelers. Each picture shows the designs, the vendor, price and the make of the jewelry.

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The full slide show can be found here.

Malaysia’s Golden Age Of Jewelry

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Intricate gems from Malaysia’s golden age of jewelry reveal cross road of cultures.

A new book on the history of Straits Chinese culture reveals page after page of dazzling, intricate jewelry combining Malay, Chinese, Indian and European designs. These pieces bring together rich materials of far-flung origins: Swiss gold thread and German organza are spun into patterns of Chinese phoenixes and peonies, while European coronets are studded with jade. Lillian Tong, director of the Pinang Peranakan Mansion in George Town, Malaysia, has curated the best of the museum’s collection in her book, Straits Chinese Gold Jewelry.

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By the late 19th century, wealthy families of mixed Chinese-Malay descent (known as the Straits Chinese or Peranakans) created a society that incorporated elements of both Asian and European cultures, reflecting their history under the Malay sultanate and Portuguese, Dutch and British rule. In the ports of Penang and Malacca, they built Victorian-style houses according to the principles of Feng Shui and amused themselves by playing polo, collecting European antiques, and commissioning jewelry.

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Jewelry was the crowning representation of the Straits Chinese identity.
Lillian Tong, author of “Straits Chinese Gold Jewelry”

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As Tong explains, jewelry was the “crowning representation of Straits Chinese identity”, serving as a marker of status as well as the increasingly specialized tastes of these merchant families. Subtlety of craft was prized as much as the display of gems and gold. The Straits Chinese wedding was a showcase of this sophisticated material culture, in which a bride might wear over a hundred gold hairpins, each a fine piece of filigree with rose-cut stones.

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The result was an unprecedented era of creativity in the region, not only in accessories but in architecture, fashion and graphics. This great age of design reached its height between 1900 and 1940, as artisans worked to fuse the luxuries of imperial China with high European style.

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The jewelry itself is a profusion of busy patterns and extraordinarily detailed workmanship. Even a heavy three-piece brooch in 22-carat gold and diamonds is so meticulously crafted that it manages to seem delicate. A tiny hairpin of pearls and silver is reserved for periods of mourning, to be gradually replaced by ornaments of sapphires and jade. For festive jewelry, Burmese rubies and gold are worked into maximalist designs of flora and fauna.

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The Straits Chinese jewelry incorporates elements of both Asian and European design.

The collection reveals the interests and fantasies of a multicultural, multilingual society. Chinese and European motifs are often combined into one piece, as Dutch tulips appear alongside Buddhist bats and deer, while Victorian silver mesh purses feature auspicious Chinese symbols. Asian blossoms are gathered into English-style garlands and bouquets, and entwined with Malay birds. The mythological and real animals of different countries are seen grazing together.

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This range of ethnic references might seem wildly eclectic today, but for the Straits Chinese community, it was possible to reconcile Europhilia with an appreciation for traditional crafts. According to Dr Alan Chong, director of Singapore’s Peranakan Museum, signature ornaments such as the kerosang (heart-shaped brooch) are derived from European jewels of the 18th and 19th centuries. The Straits Chinese were familiar with the concept of taking the best from each culture: borrowing objects from European and Chinese practice, and giving them local variations and stylistic twists.

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It is astonishing to look back on this era of playful diversity, when a hybrid mix of influences was the norm. These pieces are not only exquisite but inspiring, pointing towards a time when designers felt free to experiment, pulling ideas from every culture and blending them together.

Post is adapted from CNN dated May 5, 2014, written  by Leslie Chow

A $33 Million Faberge Golden Egg …

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Scrap metal find turns out to be $33 million Faberge golden egg

(CNN) — A $14,000 jumble sale find turned into millions of dollars for a man who’d been thwarted in his attempts to turn a quick profit by selling the tiny ornament to scrap metal dealers.

The man, who hails from the Midwest but wishes to remain anonymous, had been left financially stretched after he apparently overestimated what the tiny golden egg would be worth once melted down. He’d been hoping to make $500.

In a fit of desperation one night last year, he typed “egg” and the name engraved on the clock it contained — “Vacheron Constantin” — into Google.

His search brought up a 2011 article in Britain’s Daily Telegraph newspaper describing a “frantic search” for the object: the Third Imperial Easter Egg, made by Faberge for the Russian royal family and estimated to be worth 20 million pounds ($33 million).

Far from being a financial millstone around the scrap metal trader’s neck, it appeared the golden egg might live up to its fairy-tale namesake and avoid the furnace with just a few scratches — to assess its gold content — to show for it.

The man contacted Faberge expert Kieran McCarthy and flew to London to visit McCarthy’s workplace: Wartski jewelers in Mayfair, where the egg will be displayed to the public for only the second time, from April 14 to 17.

 

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McCarthy said he had no warning about the visit.

“A gentleman had walked in wearing jeans, a plaid shirt and trainers. His mouth was just dry with fear,” McCarthy said, to the extent that he could barely speak. “He handed me a portfolio of photographs, and there was the egg, the Holy Grail of art and antiques.”

Though he had not handled the egg itself, McCarthy said, he was “buzzing from top to toe.” He flew to the man’s home to see the object in person and confirmed that it was indeed the Third Imperial Egg.

The finder “just can’t believe his luck,” McCarthy said. “It’s almost an affirmation of his existence that this happened to him.”

McCarthy said the man had overestimated the value of the egg’s materials — which were worth about what he’d paid for it — but underestimated its value as a work of art.

This is what that object is about, this craftsmanship and demonstration of skill. If you’re not looking for it, you won’t see it.

“He didn’t look upon a work of art at all. He saw that it was pretty and it was nice, but he was buying on intrinsic value. He bought and sold. … This was quite a considerable outlay for him,” he said. “The essence of Faberge’s work is craftsmanship. It’s the beauty of design and the conceiving of that object.”

Pre-revolutionary Russia had seen “this last gasp of imperial patronage colliding with craftsmanship,” he said, as the tsar and tsarina had everything they wanted.

“Their daily lives were lived at such a height of luxury that you couldn’t really excite them with anything of intrinsic value. It was always about the craftsmanship. This is what that object is about, this craftsmanship and demonstration of skill. If you’re not looking for it, you won’t see it,” McCarthy said.

“It’s a very delicate and small object, and people never anticipate that Faberge eggs can be that size,” he said, instead imagining them to be “the size of the Empire State Building, with diamonds the size of footballs.”

 

But the eggs were a celebration of Easter and love tokens, “so in a way, they are quite modest.”

The finder was far removed from the art and antiques world and so had not recognized the object’s true value. After reading the article, he could hardly believe what he was in possession of, McCarthy said.

“He was just getting frantic. He couldn’t sleep; he couldn’t eat; he couldn’t think about anything else.”

Until the 1916 overthrow of the tsar, Carl Faberge’s jewelery workshop made 50 Easter eggs for the family, each taking a year or more to craft. According to Faberge, designs were produced in the greatest secrecy, “the only prerequisite being that they contained a surprise.”

The egg on the brink of being melted down for scrap in the U.S. had been the third made: Tsar Alexander III’s 1887 Easter gift to his wife, Tsarina Maria Feodorovna.

The 8.2-centimeter (3.2-inch) egg is on an elaborate gold stand supported by lion paw feet. Three sapphires suspend golden garlands around it, and a diamond acts an opening mechanism to reveal the Vacheron Constantin watch inside.

The egg was thought to have been lost after the Soviets listed it for sale in 1922 as part of a policy of turning “treasures into tractors,” but in 2011, Faberge researchers recognized it in a 1964 auction catalog, reviving hopes it had survived and prompting the Telegraph article.

After the revolution, 42 of the imperial eggs made their way into private collections and museums. Eight, including the Third Imperial Egg, were thought to have been lost. Two others are thought to have survived, though their locations remain a mystery.

The other five were almost certainly destroyed, McCarthy said, with no reference to them after the Revolution.

The Third Imperial Egg has been purchased by a private collector who has allowed the public to glimpse it at Wartski before it disappears from general view again.

 

Post By Susannah Cullinane, CNN, March 20, 2014

Counterfeit Gold Bars

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For those who intend to buy gold, here is something to consider:

Density of gold is 19.30 g/cm3; density of tungsten is 19.25 g/cm3.

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The article below is from FoxNews.com published on September 19, 2012

Fool’s gold: Counterfeit bars turn up in New York

A jeweler in Manhattan’s Diamond District learned the hard way that all that glitters is not gold.

Ibrahim Fadl, a chemical engineer who owns a business near 47th Street and Fifth Avenue, bought four 10-ounce gold bars and decided to check them out further since he heard counterfeits were making the rounds, MyFoxNY.com reports.

Fadl, who paid $100,000 for the merchandise, drilled into several of the bars and found gray tungsten, which has nearly the same density as gold, making it difficult to detect. The same thing reportedly happened in Great Britain earlier this year, and finance blog ZeroHedge.com reported that in 2010 German refiner W.C. Heraeus claimed to have received a 500-gram bar from an unnamed bank that proved to be filled with tungsten.

The scheme purportedly involves a genuine gold bar that is purchased with serial numbers and authentic documents and is then hollowed out to be replaced with tungsten. The bar is then closed up to finalize the sophisticated operation, the website reports.

Manfra, Tordell & Brookes, the Swiss manufacturer of the gold bars, warned customers to only buy from reputable dealers. Raymond Nessim, the company’s CEO, said he has reported the incident to the FBI and the Secret Service.

Secret Service officials, meanwhile, told FoxNews.com an investigation is ongoing, declining further comment.

Fadl, who could not be reached for comment, told NY1.com that the shell of the gold was sold to him by a customer at his gold refinery business and peeled off like foil on a candy bar.

“It’s got to be somebody really, really professional,” Fadl told the website. “When I analyzed them, it showed they were tungsten.”

Fadl said a colleague tipped him off to the scam, prompting him to further inspect the gold bars.

“Sick to my stomach, but thank God we didn’t sell this to somebody,” he said when asked how he felt. “People are selling their homes to buy gold, it’s a big issue.”

FoxNews.com’s Joshua Rhett Miller contributed to this report.

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