Diamonds

Home Diamonds Page 3

Viral Spiral: Forever Diamonds Commercial

0

Forever Diamonds’ TV commercial opens with the camera slowly panning the floor of a couple’s bedroom. A woman’s clothing, undergarments, and shoes form a trail to the footboard of a large bed. All the while, screams of excitement and steel coils making rhythmic squeaking noises fill the room. One can only assume the couple is engaged in—wait for it—marriage. That’s right. The big reveal in the Philadelphia-based jeweler’s commercial is a woman jumping for joy on a bed after receiving a big, beautiful diamond ring from her now fiancé.



What’s interesting about the TV commercial is not only its seductive humor, but also the fact that it manages to include so many relevant marketing points in a brief 15-second spot. First, it’s a small jewelry store that took a big risk in airing an edgy and, perhaps by some standards, controversial ad. Second, regardless of the typical viewer’s comfort level with such material, the double entendre comes quickly, leaving people feeling a little sheepish for making a premature judgment. The store effectively uses humor to convey the message that Forever Diamonds is the destination for diamond jewelry worth jumping for joy over. See what industry video marketing guru Nick Failla says about Forever Diamonds’ video:

“How close can you get to the line without crossing it? The theme in this spot explores that question. This commercial certainly grabs the viewer’s attention quickly and holds it. An issue you will need to consider, however, will be: Does the viewer appreciate the humorous nature of this spot; or do they find it offensive?

“If you’re in a large metropolitan area or in any area in which you are experiencing a lot of competition, you may be experiencing a real challenge in getting noticed and therefore willing to take a chance on broadcasting a spot or campaign that is more edgy. However, if you choose to air something that may cause a stir in your marketplace, you may want to consider the following questions:

  1. 1. Is my marketplace one that is conservative, moderate, or progressive?

  1. 2. If a portion of my marketplace finds the spot offensive am I willing to risk losing that portion in hopes of gaining a greater portion of the marketplace that reacts positively to the campaign?

  1. 3. If a customer finds the theme to risqué and contacts your store about the spot are all of your employees prepared to handle this customer’s concerns in a way that you find acceptable?

“Best-selling author and marketing consultant Roy Williams has been quoted as saying, ‘Any message with the power to truly move people will move some of them in the wrong direction. You can’t have a big upside without a pronounced downside. To believe otherwise is wishful thinking. Few ads are written to persuade. Most ads are written not to offend.’

“It’s up to you to decide where the acceptable line to cross with your advertising themes exists for you and your marketplace.”

By Paul Holewa, http://www.jckonline.com

World’s Largest Vivid Yellow Diamond

2

Jerry Hall Holding The 110 ct Vivid Yellow Diamond

The 110-carat vivid yellow Cora Sun-Drop diamond is on loan to the Natural History Museum in London and the museum decided to promote it with a photo shoot with former model Jerry Hall.  The unusual gem, the largest vivid yellow pear-shape diamond, belongs to Cora International.



The Cora Sun-Drop was mined in Africa and polished by Cora International, a company that specializes in very large and fancy color diamonds.

The diamond is on display until August this year.

Ref : http://www.idexonline.com dated March 2, 2011.

World’s Largest Flawless Vivid Blue Diamond May Fetch $25 Million

0
BLUE
The Blue

A 13.22-carat blue diamond is the lead item at Christie’s Geneva Magnificent Jewels sale on May 14, 2014. Known as “The Blue,” the auction house says it is the largest flawless vivid blue diamond in the world. It has a pre-auction estimate of $21 to $25 million.

Ocean Dream
The Ocean Dream

Another highlight of the 250-lot auction at the Four Seasons Hotel des Bergues is what the auction house is calling the largest fancy vivid blue-green diamond in the world to come to auction. Known as “The Ocean Dream,” the 5.50-carat gem has an estimate of $7.5 to $9.5 million. “The combination of its size, natural origin, hue, and saturated color makes it an extremely unusual occurrence,” Christie’s said in a statement.

Christies 1

Other diamonds expected to generate strong international interest include a 76.51-carat light pink cut-corned diamond set as necklace centerpiece by diamond dealer Lev Leviev with an estimate of $7 to $10 million (pictured above); and a 75.97-carat pear-shaped D-color flawless diamond with an estimate of $13.5 million to $15 million (pictured below).

white diamond

Original post by Anthony Demarco on April 22, 2014 on this link http://jewelrynewsnetwork.blogspot.com

An Exquisite Diamond Ring Auctioned For $3.55million

44

Christie’s New York Jewels sale, held this week, achieved a total of $15,226,275 and was 84 percent sold by lot. The top lot was a 27.03-carat, D, VVS1, type IIa diamond that sold for $3,554,500, or $131,500 per carat. Christie’s also sold a 10.19-carat, square-cut, fancy intense, orangy pink diamond for $2,322,500 and a 12.50-carat, pear-shaped, diamond ring for $1,482,500. These top three diamonds sold above their presale estimates.

******************

Lot Description

An Exquisite Cushion Cut Diamond 27.03ct, D,VVS1, Ex Polish & Ex Sym

An Exquisite Diamond Ring

Set with a cushion-cut diamond, weighing approximately 27.03 carats, mounted in platinum.

With report 5121072749 dated 3 May 2010 from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is D color, VVS1 clarity, with excellent polish and excellent symmetry

Accompanied by a supplemental letter stating that the diamond has been determined to be a Type IIa diamond. Type IIa diamonds are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Type IIa diamonds were first identified as originating from India (particularly from the Golconda region) but have since been recovered in all major diamond-producing regions of the world. Among famous gem diamonds, the 530.20 carat Cullinan and the 105.60 carat Koh-i-noor, are examples of Type IIa

Price Realized: $3,554,500

******************

Lot Description

Modified Square Cut Fancy Colored Diamond 10.19ct

An Important Colored Diamond Ring

Set with a cut-cornered modified square-cut fancy intense orangy pink diamond, weighing approximately 10.19 carats, flanked on either side by a shield-shaped diamond, to the circular-cut diamond prongs, gallery and hoop, mounted in platinum and 18k rose gold, ring size 6.

With report 14887695 dated 21 March 2006 from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is fancy intense orangy pink, natural color, VS1 clarity.

Price Realized: $2,322,500

******************

Lot Description

Modified Pear Shaped Pink Diamond, 12.05ct, IF

A Fine Colored Diamond Ring

Set with a modified pear-shaped light pink diamond, weighing approximately 12.50 carats, within a circular-cut pink diamond surround, mounted in 18k rose gold.

With report 2115724753 dated 22 February 2010 from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is light pink, natural color, internally flawless clarity.

Price Realized: $1,482,500

Source : Christie’s New York Sales

Rapaport: Diamond Prices Rose 10% Last Year

0

Abstract : Rapaport Report Dated December 31, 2010

The Rapaport Group reported in its communiqué dated January 7, 2010 that that polished diamond prices went up by 10.3% in 2010 following a decline of 7.6% in 2009.  It reported that prices for 0.50ct increased by 4.1%, 1.0ct by 12.3% and 3ct by 24.6%.  Prices at Rapaport Melee Auctions also increased by 57%.

Rapaport estimates that average prices for rough increase by about 21% in 2010.

US holiday sales meets expectations and dealers hope that the positive demand will extend to the Far East in view of the coming Chinese New Year on February 3, 2011. Cutters concerned mining companies may raise rough prices following strong 4Q rough sales. Israel’s 2010 polished exports +48% to $5.8B, rough imports +51% to $3.8B.  Investors start 2011 bullish as Dow reaches two-year high (11,722.89)

The group also reported that:

1) Large, high quality diamonds did well in 2010, as did small, inexpensive diamonds.

2) With more than 600,000 cutters, India now dominates diamond production, assisted by easy banking credit and a powerful local jewelry market that is growing at about 25 percent a year.

3) Diamond producers’ stockpiling and cuts in production created shortages that resulted in speculative pricing and reduced manufacturer profits.

“While the U.S. recovery will take time, the global diamond markets are well positioned for growth in 2011,” said Martin Rapaport, chairman of the Rapaport Group. “The trade is advised to enjoy the ride as long as interest rates remain low, avoid speculation and maintain liquidity.”

Note: Last year we sold a number of 1ct and above solitaire diamonds to be set as wedding and engagement rings.  Our clients have been calling us expressing their appreciation.



Diamond and Graphite

41

In the field of gemological or geological study a basic understanding on fundamentals is important for us to appreciate the subject matter more thoroughly as well as giving us a better perspective on how minerals differ from each other.

There is no intention to delve too deeply into scientific principals and a sure way to lose readership is to come up with jargons like Angstrom, icositetrahedron structure and some fancy high tech unreadable scientific terms which are only required by PhD students doing a thesis.  However, some science is inevitable and a layman’s term is laid out so that readers will have a better understanding.

Diamond and graphite are both polymorph of the native element carbon.  Minerals that represent different arrangement of their internal atoms are called polymorph.  Thus, diamond and graphite have the same chemical composition but different crystal structures.

Diamond crystallizes in the isometric system (or cubic system) while graphite crystallizes in the hexagonal system.  A schematic diagram below would be easier to understand.


Diamond has a framework structure where the carbon atoms are bonded to other carbon atoms in three dimensions as opposed to two in graphite.

Although both are of the native element carbon their properties differs as follows:

  • Diamond is the hardest mineral known to man, Graphite is one of the softest.
  • Diamond is an excellent electrical insulator, Graphite is a good conductor of electricity.
  • Diamond is the ultimate abrasive, Graphite is a very good lubricant.
  • Diamond is usually transparent, Graphite is opaque.

Hence, the diamond stone on your engagement ring is simply Carbon but take heart a diamond with excellent color and clarity is a rare mineral.

2,044FansLike
7,242FollowersFollow
303FollowersFollow

My Favorites

I Say, Son, This Is Damn Fxxking Good! “ 他妈那个 B…这简直是棒极了!”

I Say, Son, This Is Damn Fxxking Good! 我说 “ 孩儿们,他妈那个 B…这简直是棒极了!” Abstract: Occasionally sharing our own life experiences with our children can be exhilarating and...

Popular Posts