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Dye Green Quartz Bangle

first photo

Dear Arthur,

Thank you for the great opportunity that you have provided online to help many to understand more about jade and other stones.

Actually, I have a green bangle that has nice veins inside of it but when running my fingernail over the surface, I can feel cracks all over it. I decided to use a magnifying loop to see what was happening on the surface, and I could see thin cracks that form like cracked ice all over the surface. However, when running my hand over the bangle it feels very smooth.

1

Can you help me understand what is causing the cracks? I enclosed an image with the others. It shows a similar effect to what I saw on the surface when I looked at it through the magnifying glass (10X).

Is it type A or B? Thank you in advance for your input!

Leah

askaarthurlaunewbanner

Hi Leah

Unfortunately, your bangle does not belong to the pyroxene group mineral content of Jadeite Jade.

Your bangle is a dye green quartz.

quartz crystal

Quartz crystal cluster. Source: wikipedia

Quartz is a silicate compound and it is found abundantly on the earth crust. Rock crystal is another name for it, when it is clear and semi translucent or almost transparent.

combine

Dye green quartz is quite common and it is often used as an imitation to substitute for other green precious gemstones, amongst which is dyed green bangle used to imitate jade bangle. The original quartz slab is quite clear and it is through a process called quench-crackling that green dye is forced in. The quartz slab is heated to quite a high temperature. (Quartz has a melting point of about 1670oCentigrade.) Then the slab is suddenly immersed in iced cold water. The expansion and sudden contraction of the molecules within the quartz will cause the stone to fracture from within.  Thus, when the slab is fractured dyes can be forced into the cracked capillaries. The cracks are very fine lines and the bangle is then re-polished so that it retains it smooth surface.

Cracks

Quench-crackled quartz showing fragments and fractures within

You can see it quite clearly using a 10X loupe, as you have done.

I hope that you did not pay a lot of money for this imitation.

Arthur

 

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Category: Jade Qs - Bangles

About the Author: I am a Graduate Gemologist trained at GIA in New York. I hold an MBA from Cranfield University, United Kingdom and a Bachelor degree in Mathematics. My earlier profession was a banker until I found jade in Myanmar in the early 90s. I have travelled to the fabled Hpakan Jade mines and Mogok in upper Burma with my second son. Three of my children were also Graduate Gemologist, GIA and they are now dealing in diamonds.

Comments (1)

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  1. Indrid Cold says:

    Why is there no commercially available synthetic jade on the market? I’ve seen a patent http://www.google.com/patents/WO2002048038A2?cl=en that is for imperial green synthetic jadeite. Is there some international cartel suppressing it from the market?

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