The Oath – An Old Sufi Tale

June 24, 2012By

A man who was troubled in mind and finances swore that if his problems were solved he would sell his house and donate all the money gained from it to the poor.

When his problems were solved, he knew that the time had come that he must redeem his oath.  But he did not want to give away so much money.  So he thought of a way out.

He put the house on sale for one silver piece.  Included with the sale of the house, however, was a cat.  The price asked for this animal was ten thousand pieces of silver.

Another man bought the house and the cat.  The first man gave the single piece of silver to the poor and pocketed the ten thousand pieces of silver.

Many peoples’ minds work like this.  They resolve to follow a teaching and fulfill an oath, but they interpreted their relationship with it to their own advantages.  Or when they have received the newly gotten gains they make another oath that they will re-invest the new capital to make more gains so that they can donate more to the poor.

Adapted from Tales of the Dervishes by Idries Shah.

Filed in: Anecdotes & Tales Tags:

About the Author ()

I am a Graduate Gemologist trained at GIA in New York. I hold an MBA from Cranfield University, United Kingdom and a Bachelor degree in Mathematics. My earlier profession was a banker until I found jade in Myanmar in the early 90s. I have traveled to the fabled Hpakan Jade mines and Mogok in upper Burma with my second son. Three of my children were also Graduate Gemologist, GIA and they are deal in diamonds.

Comments (2)

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  1. A.Arthur Lau says:

    Yes Ivan, One has to be careful when making any vows.

    Thanks for your comments.
    arthur

  2. Ivan says:

    That’s human!

    However, those greedy people don’t know that a single cent that they give to the poor, it would come back as a million. And they don’t know that they will pay to what they have done either.

    So, be careful of making a vow or an oath if you couldn’t do it.

    Btw, poor that man.

    Ivan